“I wasn’t shocked. For the past few years, I’ve heard fans from both sides of the aisle voice discontent with our leaders, but many of them either didn’t vote or didn’t know how to vote,” she says. “Many states make it difficult to vote. When you Google your state’s voting info, you’re hit with a million ads before you find your state’s official website. It’s a clusterfuck.” So, to unfuck the process, DeVille created a one-stop, state-by-state voter registration hub—ErectionSeason.com.

Another reason DeVille developed Erection Season was because she felt her rights were increasingly under attack. “Until recently I kept my views out of porn, because both Republicans and Democrats watch porn,” she says. “As a small-business owner, I didn’t want to alienate any customers. But this is no longer an option. FOSTA-SESTA and other laws are targeting porn stars and other sex workers.”

Lawmakers passed FOSTA-SESTA in 2018 as a means to curb sex trafficking, but it had unintended consequences: It shut down many websites that sex workers relied on for income. Voting, DeVille says, is the main way average Americans like her can have a voice in a complicated political process that doesn’t always have their interests at heart. “Voting isn’t perfect in America,” she adds, “but it’s the system we have.”

Voter turnout efforts aren’t perfect, either. Celebrity thirst traps, Twitter pages like @BrattyBoysXXX, and websites like Erection Season creatively tap into our personal desires and entice voters, but their ultimate impact is negligible.

“My cynical answer is this probably isn’t going to work,” says Ryan Morgan, founder of Veracity Consulting, a digital advertising firm in Washington, DC, that has worked on campaign runs for Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. “That being said, 2020 is different. With the summer full of protests, there’s engagement like we’ve never seen before. As a reaction against President Trump, with Black Lives Matter, and the pandemic—all those things give young people more incentive to get involved.”

Morgan says effective political ads come down to highly tailored interests: For some individuals, it will be NBA players like LeBron James speaking out, for others it will be Taylor Swift urging fans to the polls. In 2008, Barack Obama’s messages of “Hope” and “Change” spoke to the soul of Americans. For certain young people in 2020, it’s thirst traps and sex-targeted messaging.

“I’m a data guy, and there are ways to tell if this message is effective, like if you do randomized control trials,” Morgan says. “But I’m guessing the people pushing out the sex-oriented messaging are not doing that, so there’s really not going to be a way to tell if this is effective in moving the needle or not. But that doesn’t mean it’s not fun and engaging.”

It’s impossible for Jayden to quantify how many people he’s actually reaching. Still, he doesn’t plan to stop using @BrattyBoysXXX as an anti-Trump platform anytime soon. “Four years ago I was crushed watching the elections,” he says. “I hope that on Election Day we reject him so resoundingly through a landslide that he and his regime have no option other than to walk away.” He’d consider it the ultimate climax.


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