Between toilet paper hoarding and Zoom happy hours, the coronavirus pandemic has forced individuals and industries around the world to adapt to a world in quarantine. Just as Hollywood has had to pause production on some of its most anticipated film projects, television has run into production dilemmas too. Which means that, like so many other things in 2020, the fall TV schedule won’t be as jam-packed with new shows as it has in previous years. But that doesn’t mean there won’t be any new shows—nor does it mean there isn’t still plenty to watch. Whether you’re looking for something brand-new, or just new-to-you, here are 15 of the TV shows everyone should be watching this fall. (Plus, share your recommendations in the comments section below.)

Fargo

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Television producers don’t have the greatest track record when it comes to translating beloved movies into TV shows. (Remember 1983’s Casablanca series with Ray Liotta? Neither does anyone else.) But Noah Hawley may have cracked the code with Fargo, which isn’t a direct remake or continuation of the Coen brothers’ Oscar-winning 1996 crime-drama/comedy, but simply exists within the same quirky, funny-accented universe. The anthology format has allowed the series to travel back and forth in time from the original movie, with loose connections from one season to the next. But where it really excels is in its uncanny reinterpretation of the Coens’ idiosyncratic style, which can be both bitingly funny and exceedingly violent—often simultaneously. It’s also filled with dozens of references to the Coens’ entire filmography. Whereas the first three seasons follow the movie’s heroic-cops-versus-bumbling-criminals storyline, the upcoming fourth season—featuring Chris Rock as the head of a crime family in 1950s Kansas City—takes a broader approach where the line between good and evil is not always so clear cut.

Where to stream it: Hulu

Ratched

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Sarah Paulson is always the best thing about whatever she’s in, especially in her collaborations with Ryan Murphy. Now she’s taking center stage in this One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest prequel, which lays out the road that nurse Mildred Ratched—played by Paulson here and Louise Fletcher (who won an Oscar for the role) in Miloš Forman’s 1975 film adaptation—took to become the monster we later see.

Where to stream it: Netflix

The Crown

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It didn’t take long for The Crown to become one of television’s most talked-about series—in part because it’s one of the most expensive shows ever produced, and it shows in every frame. Kicking off in 1947, the series traces Queen Elizabeth II’s unexpected ascension to the British throne at the age of 25 and the challenges she has faced since her coronation. While Her Majesty’s demeanor is often seemingly cold, The Crown humanizes the royal matriarch in a way that has rarely been seen before and offers a deeper understanding of what it takes to rule a country and still be a wife, mother, sister, and daughter. The series—which began its first two seasons with Claire Foy and Matt Smith as the queen and Prince Philip, before Oscar-winner Olivia Colman (the queen of acceptance speeches) and Tobias Menzies took over—is as enthralling for history buffs as it is for royal enthusiasts. (John Lithgow playing Winston Churchill was one of the show’s highlights.) As the series marches forward in time (season 4 will drop on November 15), Princess Diana (played by Emma Corrin) will make her royal entrance and Gillian Anderson will introduce Margaret Thatcher into the proceedings. The main cast will change once again for its final two seasons (5 and 6), with Imelda Staunton taking over the throne.